Not Everyone Should

Serious writers who’ve been in this business for any length of time quickly learn that most folks don’t respect the hard work that goes into our craft. Those non-writers who do respect the craft are usually avid, serious readers, though I know a few non-readers who respect it, too (but not many). At least, this has been my experience. Sadly, such serious readers are in the minority these days.

Although I’m an indie author, which I love, I’ve also been published traditionally. Hey, I started back in the early 1980s before desktop and laptop computers. One of the downsides of indie books, though, is that anyone can publish a book now. Good for us professional writers, sure, but bad for the indie industry as a whole, I think.

Why do I say this? Because these days, since anyone can write and publish a book, too many people write them who shouldn’t. Why not? Because they don’t understand writing basics, nor have they bothered to study the craft, nor have they worked to improve. Lots of indie books appear thrown together without any revision, little or no research, and scant attention paid to plot, characterization, and similar things. An unpolished indie book reflects poorly on the indie industry as a whole. Therefore, just because a person can have their book published doesn’t mean they should. That being said, if a person invests the necessary time to practice and study the craft…then definitely, going indie is great.

And this brings me back to what I said in my first paragraph. Oftentimes, when people hear that a friend has had an indie book published, the word “poorly written” comes to their minds. Why? Because they’ve purchased a poorly written indie book in the past. Thus, even though a person may be a serious reader, if he/she isn’t familiar with our work, it may get passed over for a more familiar author. The potential reader automatically assumes we wrote an amateurish book.

As professional indie authors, then, we need to write at the very top of our game. We need to promote our books at the top of our game as well. Approach our writing with a professional attitude, work like a professional writer, and we’ll reap numerous benefits in return.

I know this sounds strange, but it’s something I learned at a writers conference when I started out in the ‘80s—I dress professionally when I enter my writing office. I find that I’m more productive when I’m wearing a nice shirt and trousers (sometimes even a tie and/or blazer) than I am when I wear a beat-up polo shirt and jeans. Writing is a profession, and it’s a calling. Ignore what others may think and say. Be professional in all things pertaining to writing. It pays off in the end!

Being Professional


Blog Writer
With today’s technology, it’s become easier for wannabe writers to see their work published. Indeed, thousands of books are out there clamoring for readers’ attention. The ease with which publication has become, though, presents its own issues for self-published authors.

We must understand that professional writing requires more of us than just sitting down at our laptops, whipping out a manuscript, and then self-publishing it. It goes well beyond that first draft, second draft, even third draft. It takes long hours of hard work and revision till we see polished prose.

Just as we can’t repair a car if we don’t understand how its engine works, so we can’t engage in effective revision if we don’t understand what makes good writing work. Effective writing entails numerous elements, too many to discuss in one blog. Each element requires constant practice. For serious authors, writing is a daily discipline. Professional writers don’t wait for the inspiration bug to hit them. Professional writers…write! 

Do we want our self-published books to stand out among all the other indie books on the market? Do we want to be taken seriously as authors? Do we want to sell our books? If so, we must approach our craft the same way all serious writers approach it— through disciplined study, practice, and writing every day.

In future posts I’ll discuss different writing techniques and other literary issues that will help us all write more professionally. For most folks, writing at this level doesn’t happen overnight. It didn’t with me. Only after working at my craft for six years did I begin selling my manuscripts on a consistent basis.

Let me encourage you, then—work hard, study the craft, and write every day.

 

 

Till next time, I’ll see y’all at the Cove.